Early Girl Tomatoes

Early Girl

Early Girl is probably about four feet tall — maybe taller — and has several fruits on the vine.

Most of the other varieties I planted also have little fruits — Black Krim, Sun Sugar, Ponderosa Red — but none are as far along as the aptly-named Early Girl.

I planted the remainder of the Ponderosa Red tomato plants that didn’t find a forever home with co-workers, so the final tomato plant count is:

  • Four Ponderosa Red in the veggie garden
  • One Ponderosa Red in a container
  • One Black Krim in the garden
  • One Sun Sugar (cherry) in the garden
  • One Sun Sugar in a container
  • One Yellow Pear in the garden (failing to thrive)
  • One Yellow Pear in a container
  • One Early Girl in the garden

Also in the vegetable garden: three Black Beauty eggplants, one Millionaire eggplant, and one cucumber.

Even though some of my seedlings didn’t make it (mostly basils and flowers), I’m pretty pleased with my vegetable garden so far this year.

Veggie Garden

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: June 2017

In no particular order, I present to you what has been blooming in my Zone 6a/6b garden in NW Ohio over the past couple of days:

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - June 2017

I’m not precisely sure what this is. This is the first year I haven’t yanked it out before it even thought about blooming. I’m hoping it’s some sort of woodland native that some creature transplanted here, as I live about half a mile from a nature preserve.
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I feel funny when people are so impressed by the fact that I grew these tomato plants from seed. I’m figuring it out, but I’m no master.

So far in this week’s tomato exodus, I’ve given away four Early Girl, four Yellow Pear, and one Sun Sugar tomato plant. Twelve more to go!

First Strawberry

Check out this strawberry!

Connor was SO excited to see that the first Aromas strawberry was ripe. We planted them last spring, both in a large container and outside in the garden, and the container we overwintered in the sunroom brought forth ripe fruit this spring before the plants outdoors.

I gave it to him as part of his dinner tonight (along with our dinner frittata and a side of grapes and cheese cubes).

The consensus? “Blech!”

Really?

Yep. He let me finish the berry he’d bitten into, and while it looked red and it was quite juicy, it wasn’t nearly as sweet as a truly ripe berry should be.

So, let that be a lesson to us: once it looks ripe, give it a little more time — maybe a couple of days? The outdoor strawberries are going gangbusters with green berries right now, so we’ll get to try our hand at identifying ripe berries (and protecting them from the birds) soon enough.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: May 2017

Tulip ‘Angelique,’ the tree peony, the earliest red herbaceous peonies, and the dogwood blooms have all faded. Now my Zone 6 garden is preparing for the next wave of awesomeness.

Starting along the front fence, where passersby are most likely to enjoy the view for a few seconds as they speed past…

The Amur Honeysuckle is in bloom and throwing a magnificent scent.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day: May 2017

The herbaceous peonies have been ready to pop for a couple of weeks, it seems.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day: May 2017

The front fence used to be more festive in the spring, until one landscaper a couple years back thought my oriental poppies looked like broadleaf weeds and nuked them with Round-Up, and overmulched my Siberian Irises such that most of them didn’t make it. The ones that did make it got weed-whacked by our lawn guys earlier this spring; apparently, they looked like grass to someone.

Chalk it up to life experience, and the knowledge that gardens are mutable and ever-changing, anyway. Moving on…  (more…)