Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: April 2021

Since last month’s Bloom Day, the hyacinths have come and gone, and the earliest of the daffodils have started to fade — including the gorgeous Apricot Whirl variety I planted in the fall, and the striking bi-color daffodil that I finally remembered to move from its out-of-the-way spot in the peony border to a more prominent place along the front walk.

This was the year that I finally got out at the right time and moved my daffs “in the green.” Some folks claim that daffodils can be fussy when it comes to springtime transplanting, and others see their relocated narcissi bloom just fine later that same spring. Thankfully, my experience was more of the latter kind, so I’m well on my way to having my garden path lined with inviting spring blooms!

Not all of the daffodils got re-homed; some of them were already in a perfect massed spot close to the road, where all the passersby can enjoy them.

The west-facing flowerbed that’s visible from the kitchen window is the one I refer to as the Early Spring Border. The grape hyacinth (muscari) and brunnera are just two reasons why. Earlier, there were dwarf reticulated irises, fragrant hyacinths, and a few daffodils; later on, there will be alliums and peonies and camassia.

My neighbor gifted me a pot of columbines a few years ago, and I never got around to getting it in the ground. It finally bloomed in purple and yellow this year, despite my benign neglect… and the strawberry plants that seem to have hitched a ride in the same container have started to spill out and spread into the border. I don’t really mind.

Finally, since the dogwood in the front garden is on its last legs, I decided to spare this redbud sapling that sprung up here a couple years back. We’ll need another tree here eventually, anyway, and clearly this redbud likes this spot.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: March 2021

Each year, this is when it begins.

Slowly but surely, the spring bulbs reach for the sun.

This year, in addition to the Reticulated Iris and the very beginnings of hyacinth buds, I also have cream-colored crocuses.

By the next Bloom Day, the daffodils and hyacinths will be in full force… but we mustn’t rush things.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: February 2021

Mid-February is the season for snowstorms here in Zone 6 Northwest Ohio. I’m grateful to have my stalwart kalanchoes in bloom indoors.

The purple shamrock is also in bloom!

Also, even though we were quarantined for COVID exposure and had to get our groceries delivered to our home, my husband still managed to sneak a grocery-store Valentine’s Day bouquet onto the list without me knowing.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: December 2020

There’s not much bloom action happening outside right now in my Zone 6 garden in northwest Ohio; all the color is indoors.

Above: I received this African violet as a birthday gift from a co-worker at my previous job, some 15 years ago now. Since then, I’ve started a second plant from it… or is this the second plant?

Below: I only recently learned that the correct pronunciation of this plant’s name is not, in fact, kuh-LAN-cho — it’s kal-uhn-KO-ee. However you pronounce it, I have several kalanchoes that bloom in different colors, descended from cuttings from a former co-worker at my current employer about five or six years back.

This purple shamrock was a gift from a coworker who still works with me (hi, N! *waves*), also about five or six years ago. Even though it’s not currently in bloom, it still adds a welcome dash of color to my home.

I promise, not all of my houseplants were gifts from co-workers… just the more colorful ones, I guess.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: November 2020

We finally got a killing frost a couple days back, followed by high winds and rain today. Up until then, though, a few blooms were hanging in there in my Zone 6 garden.

The nasturtiums kept on keeping on right up until the temps dropped below freezing.

Even after the frost, this volunteer zebra mallow was perky and colorful. Not until today’s high winds did it start to look like it was done for the season.

I’ve already blogged about Crocus sativus a couple of times, so I’ll just note that I managed to harvest saffron threads from six crocuses before the frost. Eighteen saffron threads should be enough to make one recipe of something delicious. Hopefully I’ll get more blooms (and a bigger saffron harvest) after they’ve settled in for a year.

Indoors, the Thanksgiving cactus is almost in bloom, and a couple of kalanchoes are providing orange and fuchsia accents… but I’ll save photos of those for next month, when the outdoors is bereft of blooms to share.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: October 2020

Last week was the first light frost of autumn in my Zone 6 garden. While these photos were taken before the frost, most of the blooms actually held up well.

photo: bee on orange flower

Although I already made mention of this in last month’s Bloom Day post, I really have to thank Nan Ondra of Hayefield for making her seeds available online. This Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) is seriously my new favorite annual, with dozens of blooms on many branched stems reaching six feet tall and nearly as wide. I hadn’t thought of orange as a color I’d want more of in my borders, but this plant changed my mind bigtime.

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: September 2020

These photos were all taken on September 15th, although it took a bit longer than anticipated for me to actually sit down and post them.

Thanks as always to Carol Michel for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month! As Elizabeth Lawrence said, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.”

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: August 2020

I took the following photos on Bloom Day, which is the 15th of the month — after which I realized that I’d (temporarily) lost my mojo for processing digital photos on my desktop computer, since I’m so accustomed to uploading them via my phone. Silly HEIC image format, throwing a wrench into the works…

At any rate, here they are… mostly so Future Me can remember what was in bloom in August 2020.

This was my first year starting Mexican sunflowers, and I really adore their pop of color!
I have no idea what this volunteer might be. It made itself a home next to my anemone, and I actually quite like it. If it’s a perennial, it may get relocated somewhere more appropriate, though.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day: July 2020

Blooms always seem to be scarce in the heat of mid-July — especially when deer have eaten the lilies. I think some deer-resistant, drought-loving native plants are in my future.

I do love the blooms on the hostas.
Heritage English rose will keep blooming in flushes as long as I keep deadheading.
Everybody loves the milkweed, from fuzzy bumbles to hummingbirds to caterpillars.
Gooseneck loosestrife can be a bit aggressive at times, but I don’t mind much.

As always, many thanks to Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting Bloom Day on the 15th of every month!